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3 edition of Samuel Sewall and the world he lived in found in the catalog.

Samuel Sewall and the world he lived in

Samuel Sewall and the world he lived in

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Published by De Wolfe, Fiske & Company in Boston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sewall, Samuel, -- 1652-1730

  • Edition Notes

    StatementBy Rev. N.H. Chamberlain.
    SeriesLibrary of American civilization -- LAC 14236.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationxv, 319 p.
    Number of Pages319
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17547026M

    Samuel Smith Sewall was born on 10 April in New Castle, Pennsylvania. 2 He was the son of Milton Ellsworth Sewall and Emma Louise Anderson. 1 Samuel Smith Sewall married Vera Elizabeth Oles on 11 June in New Castle, Pennsylvania. 3 Samuel Smith Sewall died on 27 April in Warren, Trumbull County, Ohio, at the age of 4,5.   Eve LaPlante's book is subtitled, "The Life and Repentance of Samuel Sewall." Why did he need to repent? Because in , he was one of five judges who condemned twenty innocent people to death for the practice of witchcraft. The chapters dealing directly with the witchcraft trials are entitled, "In Satan's Grip," "Speedy and Vigorous. After Judge Sewall signed an address to Governor Thomas Hutchinson, his mansion in Cambridge was wrecked by a mob in September, He fled to Boston, and a few months later took ship for England, where he lived for a short time in London, and afterward mostly in Bristol. His estate in Massachusetts was confiscated under the act of A discourse occasioned by the death of the Honourable Stephen Sewall, Esq. Chief-justice of the Superiour Court of Judicature, Court of Assize, and General-Goal-Delivery; as also a member of His Majesty's Council for the province of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England: who departed this life on Wednesday-night, September


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Samuel Sewall and the world he lived in Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: Biographies History: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Chamberlain, N.H. (Nathan Henry), Samuel Sewall and the world he lived in.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Chamberlain, N.H. (Nathan Henry), Samuel Sewall and the world he lived in. New York, Russell & Russell []. Samuel Sewall and the World He Lived In (Classic Reprint) [N.

Chamberlain] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Excerpt from Samuel Sewall and the World He Lived In Sewall's Diary, therefore, covers, in time. Samuel Sewall (/ ˈ s uː əl /; Ma – January 1, ) was a judge, businessman, and printer in the Province of Massachusetts Bay, best known for his involvement in the Salem witch trials, for which he later apologized, and his essay The Selling of Joseph (), which criticized slavery.

He served for many years as the chief justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court of. Samuel Sewall and the World He Lived in Nathan Henry Chamberlain (–) Sewall, Samuel, and the World He Lived in, by N. Chamberlain (), is an account of one of the most notable of the early Puritan worthies, who was graduated from Harvard College inonly fifty-one years after the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth.

The World He Lived In Item Preview remove-circle The World He Lived In by Samuel Sewall. Publication date Topics Church Purity Collection millionbooks; universallibrary Language English. Addeddate Collectionid BOOK COVER download.

download 1 file. Full text of "Samuel Sewall and the world he lived in" See other formats. Samuel Sewall, British-American colonial merchant and a judge in the Salem witchcraft trials, best remembered for his Diary (Massachusetts Historical Society; 3 vol., –82), which provides a rewarding insight into the mind and life of the late New England Puritan.

A graduate of Harvard College. Samuel Edmund Sewall () was an American lawyer, abolitionist, and was one of the founders of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society inlent his legal expertise to the Underground Railroad, and served a term in the Massachusetts Senate as a Free-Soiler.

Sewall was involved in several notable cases involving refugees from slavery, including George Latimer, Shadrach. A well-researched and readable account of the only Salem Witch Hunt judge who ever felt any real remorse.

He was the only judge during those trials that apologized publicly and in his own way tried to make amends. The book is heavily quoted from Samuel Sewall's own diary that he kept for the majority of his long life/5.

Sewall, Samuel (syo͞o`əl), –, American colonial jurist, b. England. He was taken as a child to Newbury, Mass., and was graduated from Harvard in He became a minister but gave up the cloth to assume management of a printing press in Boston and entered upon a public career. He was elected () to the general court and was a member of.

The Salem witch hunt of has entered our vocabulary as the very essence of injustice. Biographer and novelist Richard Francis looks at the familiar drama with fresh eyes, grasping the true significance of this cataclysm through the personal story of Samuel Sewall, New England Puritan, Salem trial judge, antislavery agitator, defender of Native American rights, utopian/5.

Sewall, Samuel. Born: Ma Hampshire, England. Died: January 1, Boston, Massachusetts. Businessman and public official. Samuel Sewall was a prominent businessman and judge in Boston, Massachusetts, during a time of social and political upheaval in the New England colonies.

He is known today for making a dramatic public apology for the role he played as a judge in. Samuel Sewall was one of the few early Americans to record his day to day thoughts in a diary. It ia a very intimate look into his life as he never intended for anyone to ever read it.

This gives us a unique and accurate glimpse into the mind of a second-generation New England s: 2. Samuel Sewall, Chief Justice of Massachusetts, was born, 28 March,at Bishopstoke, Hants, England, the son of the Reverend Henry and Jane (Dummer) Sewall, who had already been for a short season at Newbury, in Massachusetts, New England.

Henry came back to America inand Mrs. Sewall, with her little family, returned to Newbury in SAMUEL SEWALL, whose Diary has done more than any other book to make the intimate life of New England, toward the close of the seventeenth and in the early decades of the eighteenth century, familiar to modern readers, was born in Bishopstoke, England, in and died in Boston, Massachusetts, in He was brought to New England in youth, entered Harvard at fifteen, took his Bachelor’s.

Samuel Sewall (Ma – January 1, ) was a Massachusetts judge, best known for his involvement in the Salem witch trials, for which he later apologized, and his essay The Selling of Joseph (), which criticized slavery.

Thanks to Judge Samuel's great X6 grandson, Professor Theodore P. Wright, Jr., for news of a recent book about Samuel Sewall and the times in which he lived: Richard Francis, Judge Sewall's Apology, Harper Collins, New York, This "apology" brings us to a dark corner of the history of Massachusetts: The Salem Witch Trials of There is one glorious exception, and that is the Diary of Samuel Sewall.

Sewall, who lived from towas one of New England's leading citizens. If he hadn't kept a diary through almost his entire life, he'd be known, if he was known, only as one of the judges at the Salem witch trials. To his credit, he was in later life ashamed of the.

Sewall’s Relationship with Family Samuel Sewall lived a very Puritan life in early colonial Boston. As a man who cared deeply for his religion and his family, Sewall dearly loved his family and viewed their good and poor health as God’s reward or punishment.

Diary of Samuel Sewall:Volume 2; Volume 6 Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Diary of Samuel Sewall:Samuel Sewall: Author: Samuel Sewall: Publisher: Massachusetts Historical Society, Original from: Harvard University: Digitized: Jan 8, Export Citation: BiBTeX EndNote RefMan.

Francis's book succeeds because it does not attempt to compass the conscience of the changing New World; instead, it allows Sewall to give voice to the world in which he lived. The author decrypts his microcosm with skill, conjuring a recognizably moral man and the increasingly complex community in which he came of age.

— The Washington Post. Original account book kept by Samuel Sewall, My grandparents lived on Sewall's Hill.

That document just fell between the cracks and there was no copy in. Chamberlain, Samuel Sewall and the World He Lived In (Boston, )() [online text] Judith S. Graham, Puritan Family Life: The Diary of Samuel Sewall (Boston: Northeastern University Press, ) Theodore B. Strandness, Samuel Sewall: A Puritan Portrait (East.

He came to New England at the age of nine, studied divinity at Harvard, entered the ministry, married, and thereafter devoted himself to public affairs.

He held numerous offices in the Massachusetts colony, becoming in a judge of the Superior Court, and in its Chief Justice. Samuel Sewall indulged in no Jeremiads He was by nature not inclined to look on the world around him with a disapproving eye. New England had been kind to him, and in his comfortable prosperity he lived on an even keel Although Winslow's work is thorough, Winslow does not appear to.

SAMUEL SEWALL (), American jurist, was born at Horton, near Bishopstoke, Hants, England, on the 28th of March He was taken to New England in ; graduated at Harvard in ; studied divinity; and was resident fellow of Harvard inand keeper of the college library in 'Gives voice to the world in which Sewall lived.

Francis decrypts his microcosm with skill, conjuring a recognizably moral man and the increasingly complex community in which he came of age,'Washington Post. Sewall was the only judge who publicly apologized for the Salem witch trials. pages, softcover. HarperPerennial. Judge Sewall's Apology: The Salem Witch Trials () by.

Samuel Sewall and the world he lived in by: Chamberlain, N. (Nathan Henry), Published: () The diary and life of Samuel Sewall / by: Sewall, Samuel, Published: () Diary of Samuel Sewall, The Samuel Sewall diaries were published in Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 5th series, vols.

(); and in two volumes as The Diary of Samuel Sewall,by M. Halsey Thomas (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, []). Samuel Sewall would undoubtedly be pleased to know that, in the end, he would be best remembered not for his participation in the trials, but for his writings, which include his "Diary," as well.

8 The second grisaille image of Sewall appears as the frontispiece of N. Chamberlain, Samuel Sewall and the World He Lived In (Boston: De Wolfe, Fiske & Co. The Mental World of Samuel Sewall 2 3 club at a small boy, thinking he was a dog ().

People coped with the dark by going to bed early and arising at daybreak. The town be came quiet once the streets were empty, so quiet that the beat of a drum in Charlestown could be heard across the water in Boston (1: ).

Any sudden sound awakened. Written by the sixth great-granddaughter to Samuel Sewall, the book offers a personal insight into why Samuel Sewall sought forgiveness for his part in the Salem Witch Trials. LaPlante begins the book with Samuel, as she refers to him, at the age of 31 taking care of.

He out of an eager desire to get Riches, and Honour; did by the mediation of Gasper Colligny the Admiral forementioned, obtain a Licence of the King to set forth a Fleet, and carry the French Ensigns into the New World.

Upon the 13th of November, he arrived at the capacious Harbour, which by the Portugals is called Januarius, being in about Nathan Henry Chamberlain, Samuel Sewall and the World He Lived In (Boston: De Wolfe, Fiske & Co., ) Elizabeth Ola Winslow, Samuel Sewall of Boston (New York: Macmillan Co., ).

Related Writings by Other Authors. Chamberlain Samuel Sewall And The World He Lived In Second Edition. $ He Turned. He Turned The World Upside Down Kielbrown Lenten Devotions 2nd Book Rare.

$ Paul Revere And The World He Lived In Book By Ester Forbes - Illus. - Kd $ Paul Revere. Paul Revere And World He Lived In - Esther Forbes. Sewall, Samuel, Letter-book of Samuel Sewall. (Boston: The Society, ) (page images at HathiTrust) Sewall, Samuel, Letters of Samuel Lee and Samuel Sewall relating to New England and the Indians, (Cambridge: J.

Wilson and Son, ), also by Samuel Lee and George Lyman Kittredge (page images at HathiTrust). Samuel Sewall was used to talking freely with God.

He had spent seven years at Harvard College studying for the ministry. He knew much of the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures, in both ancient and modern languages, from memory and was familiar with numerous devotional manuals.

The words flowed, but still his feeble child moaned. Samuel Wardwell. Samuel Wardwell was born on to a modest Quaker family in Boston. He studied carpentry and moved to Andover, Massachusetts in to find work. There he married his second wife, Sarah Hawkes, a wealthy widow with whom he had seven children.

Inhe was accused of witchcraft and brought to trial in Salem. InSewall wrote A Memorial Relating to the Kennebeck Indians, arguing for humane treatment of Indians.

He remained actively involved in his community and entered detailed accounts in his diary to the end. On January 1,Samuel Sewall died in Boston at the age of seventy-seven.

Susan Clair Imbarrato Minnesota State University--Moorhead.He alone stood before society and proclaimed that society had done wrong. He took responsibility for his actions and thus his outstanding moral character does not diminish because of his mistakes during Bibliography Judith S.

Graham, Puritan Family Life: The Diary of Samuel Sewall. Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press, See also G. E. Ellis, An Address on the Life and Character of Chief Justice Samuel Sewall () ; N.

H. Chamberlain, Samuel Sewall and The World He Lived In () ; and articles in J. L. Sibley's Biographical Sketches of Graduates of Harvard University, vol. ii. p. and by C. H. C. Howard in Essex Institute Historical Collec tions, vol.